Weekly Response: Jaxon’s "One Approach to Guiding Peer Response"

This article reads more like a TIW than an essay. I am going to try out her ideas on Tuesday! The students are just starting their research papers in class, and next week we will use Jaxon's style of peer editing. Her directions are clear, and her examples are instructive. At first I thought she was unclear, because she offers peer response guidelines for a proposal, but then discusses only the peer review given for a first draft of a research paper. I read this again, and I see that she is suggesting that the students look at the assignment and then compose questions that will be answered in the peer review document. She gave the assignment and questions composed for the proposal document. Later, when she gives an example of peer feedback for the actual research paper, we don't get to see the assignment or the questions composed.


The part about having the class come up with the questions that guide the peer review won't work as well in my class, so I will change that. I'll provide the questions her class composed as a guide for the proposal feedback, and I'll compose the guide questions for feedback for the actual paper myself.

I am concerned that some students (I already know who they are) might not complete the peer review. That would be very disappointing for the authors. Jaxon suggests the peer review should be worth a significant amount of points. Hmm, I'll need to revamp my rubric this weekend. And I'll have some Moodle postings to make; I'm going to use some of her text verbatim as assignments.

Surprisingly, Jaxon (from California) laid out precise and executable lesson plans, albeit with some omissions, and explained why they work. She gave detailed instructions and examples. So I'll cut the West Coast gal a break. BTW, looked it up, Cal State Chico is way up north. I knew she couldn't be So-Cal; she's closer to Portland than LA. Thanks, Jaxon!

Weekly Response: Jaxon’s "One Approach to Guiding Peer Response"

This article reads more like a TIW than an essay. I am going to try out her ideas on Tuesday! The students are just starting their research papers in class, and next week we will use Jaxon's style of peer editing. Her directions are clear, and her examples are instructive. At first I thought she was unclear, because she offers peer response guidelines for a proposal, but then discusses only the peer review given for a first draft of a research paper. I read this again, and I see that she is suggesting that the students look at the assignment and then compose questions that will be answered in the peer review document. She gave the assignment and questions composed for the proposal document. Later, when she gives an example of peer feedback for the actual research paper, we don't get to see the assignment or the questions composed.


The part about having the class come up with the questions that guide the peer review won't work as well in my class, so I will change that. I'll provide the questions her class composed as a guide for the proposal feedback, and I'll compose the guide questions for feedback for the actual paper myself.

I am concerned that some students (I already know who they are) might not complete the peer review. That would be very disappointing for the authors. Jaxon suggests the peer review should be worth a significant amount of points. Hmm, I'll need to revamp my rubric this weekend. And I'll have some Moodle postings to make; I'm going to use some of her text verbatim as assignments.

Surprisingly, Jaxon (from California) laid out precise and executable lesson plans, albeit with some omissions, and explained why they work. She gave detailed instructions and examples. So I'll cut the West Coast gal a break. BTW, looked it up, Cal State Chico is way up north. I knew she couldn't be So-Cal; she's closer to Portland than LA. Thanks, Jaxon!