Blog 5: Commenting on Responding to Student Writing & Voice in Writing

Commenting on Responding to Student Writing & Voice in Writing
By Andaiye Hall

My biggest beef with PeterElbow was his choice to not chose one side or the other. He made me into his article until he tried to take a neutral stance in the arrogant on voice is important I'm on the pro-voice side. I liked when he said "Voice is an important dimension of texts and we should pay lots of attention to it. Everyone has a real voice and can write with power. Writing with a strong voice is good writing. Sincere writing is good writing. My voice is my true self and my rhetorical power. The goal of teaching writing is to develop the self." (168)

When Elbow summarized the skeptics I completely disagreed with the statement "we do not write, we are written by our culture." (168) I may be influenced by my culture but I am an individual person with my own beliefs and way of thinking. My culture doesn't define me and what I write. I never knew there was so much debate over voice until I read this article.

When Elbows quoted one of Jane Danielewicz students and their comment in response to her I was completely rooting for the student. They said "I turned down your suggestion for revising just because I thought it took away some of my personal voice in some places." (170) I think the student was not being rude but in fact correct and very justified. Some teachers may find the student's comment rude but I personally agree with the student. Sometimes after making revisions your original voice gets lost and your original plan gets lost with that.

When I was reading I thought about how voice is what gets people who plagiarize caught. Teachers and professors are often quick to recognize the consulted authors's voice or even just sense that this is not the students voice. It's something so magical when you think about it. Just by looking at word's on a page you can get a sense of who wrote it and you can tell a lot about the author.

In Sommer's article, I got a sense of understanding the teacher's situation in commenting on papers. They really don't have much time. As a young student I don't think I've considered that teachers have alot on their plate and that's the cause for comments that don't have much meat to them and instead sometimes hurt feelings and leave students confused. The question is what are we going to do about it?

Blog 5: Commenting on Responding to Student Writing & Voice in Writing

Commenting on Responding to Student Writing & Voice in Writing
By Andaiye Hall

My biggest beef with PeterElbow was his choice to not chose one side or the other. He made me into his article until he tried to take a neutral stance in the arrogant on voice is important I'm on the pro-voice side. I liked when he said "Voice is an important dimension of texts and we should pay lots of attention to it. Everyone has a real voice and can write with power. Writing with a strong voice is good writing. Sincere writing is good writing. My voice is my true self and my rhetorical power. The goal of teaching writing is to develop the self." (168)

When Elbow summarized the skeptics I completely disagreed with the statement "we do not write, we are written by our culture." (168) I may be influenced by my culture but I am an individual person with my own beliefs and way of thinking. My culture doesn't define me and what I write. I never knew there was so much debate over voice until I read this article.

When Elbows quoted one of Jane Danielewicz students and their comment in response to her I was completely rooting for the student. They said "I turned down your suggestion for revising just because I thought it took away some of my personal voice in some places." (170) I think the student was not being rude but in fact correct and very justified. Some teachers may find the student's comment rude but I personally agree with the student. Sometimes after making revisions your original voice gets lost and your original plan gets lost with that.

When I was reading I thought about how voice is what gets people who plagiarize caught. Teachers and professors are often quick to recognize the consulted authors's voice or even just sense that this is not the students voice. It's something so magical when you think about it. Just by looking at word's on a page you can get a sense of who wrote it and you can tell a lot about the author.

In Sommer's article, I got a sense of understanding the teacher's situation in commenting on papers. They really don't have much time. As a young student I don't think I've considered that teachers have alot on their plate and that's the cause for comments that don't have much meat to them and instead sometimes hurt feelings and leave students confused. The question is what are we going to do about it?

Our Changing Society

Colleagues,

I am excited to be your discussion leader this week as we engage in two new topics of conversation, technology and diversity in the classroom. We will analyze the following two readings, both of which argue in favor of education reform:

- “Teaching Writing in the Multilingual World” by Paul Kei Matsuda
- “Blogs, Wikis, Podcastsby Will Richardson


Also, please bring with you a fully charged laptop and earbuds because we will be using Nearpod to engage in this week's readings.

Finally, please take a minute to read my analysis of our increasingly technological savvy, diverse society.




Our Changing Society

Colleagues,

I am excited to be your discussion leader this week as we engage in two new topics of conversation, technology and diversity in the classroom. We will analyze the following two readings, both of which argue in favor of education reform:

- “Teaching Writing in the Multilingual World” by Paul Kei Matsuda
- “Blogs, Wikis, Podcastsby Will Richardson


Also, please bring with you a fully charged laptop and earbuds because we will be using Nearpod to engage in this week's readings.

Finally, please take a minute to read my analysis of our increasingly technological savvy, diverse society.