Presentation Stuff

Here are links to the materials for my presentation tonight:

Review Paper: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0ENMKQP7b-PVHViaDdEUDZmMTA

Slides: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1kHj-Rgeqo1vRfINUAJq1VGb7vr6K0u6x3kaOS_Do7Jw

"Richetti Method" Essay: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0ENMKQP7b-PR3JKbkYzT2NNZWs

I will also be sharing my Review Paper via email instead of distributing hard copies in class tonight.


Presentation Stuff

Here are links to the materials for my presentation tonight:

Review Paper: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0ENMKQP7b-PVHViaDdEUDZmMTA

Slides: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1kHj-Rgeqo1vRfINUAJq1VGb7vr6K0u6x3kaOS_Do7Jw

"Richetti Method" Essay: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0ENMKQP7b-PR3JKbkYzT2NNZWs

I will also be sharing my Review Paper via email instead of distributing hard copies in class tonight.


Formula and Tradition–Blog #9

I didn't know what to expect at the start of this Why the "Research Paper" Isn't Working (2011), considering how strongly I feel about the importance of research papers, but I found myself nodding in understanding with much of what author Barbara Fister had to say on the topic. A lot of the research paper process can translate as pointless and confusing rules, and much of this pointless confusion begins and ends with citations. At the start of her article, Fister links to a blog post that she wrote in 2009, called Manual Labor, in which she mourns the stupidity of the updated MLA and APA guidelines. One part of this article that particularly stood out to me was the following paragraph:
And what exactly are the learning outcomes of creating an error-free list of references? You learn that research is a pain in the butt. You learn that it’s really, really important to follow pointless rules with utter scrupulousness. You learn that, at the end of the day, you’ll get points off because you didn’t follow the pointless rules – unless, of course, you’re making a bundle off book sales, in which case “nonsignificant” is a valid defense.
Really though, if we're being honest, where is the lie? We've all had that that one professor. The type you're terrified of because s/he is the type to take away credit due to an incorrectly applied citation, or quotation style. We've all written research papers, done the research, and worried all the while that that one professor might focus too much on style over content. And most of us, as Fister points out, have thrown together the Works Cited page the night before the paper was due, with painstaking attention paid to every word for fear of being penalized for an incorrect citation style. If you stop to think about it, this does sound pretty ludicrous.

Going back to the assigned article, Fister makes another compelling point in saying:
The first year 'research paper' has always sent a mixed message. You’re supposed to be original, but must quote someone else to back up every point you make - while in constant fear that you’ll be accused of stealing from them.The obscure rules of citing sources only exacerbates the confusion and focuses attention on mechanics.
Fister suggests that students writing outside of the research paper structure have plenty to say because they aren't limited and find more personal satisfaction outside of the traditional conventions. She proposes that students learn enough to know the importance of finding sources and valid information, but suggests that the traditional research paper isn't the right way to go about presenting this information. She suggests, "If you want students to learn about a topic and be able to synthesize information effectively, fine – but don’t call it research. Turn it into a presentation, an informational brochure, or a Wikipedia article." She then notes an interesting counter to the traditional research paper, an idea presented by Nick Carbone, that students "first learn to write using sources the way people outside academia do—drawing them into the text as journalists and essayists do. The fussiness of citation rules can be left until students are writing something truly academic, in their junior or senior year."

Now, for my opinion. I think this is an interesting theory, and I think it could work for some students, particularly those who aren't going to care that much about style in the first place. Ultimately however, I feel the same way about this as I do about the importance of learning grammar in the classroom-- it's important. As an English major, I've had that one professor and by God, I'm grateful for her because, despite the hell she put me through, I learned how to format a paper. She taught me awareness, and she taught me that there are certain ways to do things. I don't think style should be judged over content, but it is important, and there is something to be said for tradition. The students who are going to care about strict attention to style will learn how to work with it, and those who need just survive the class will experience the true way of formatting a traditional paper.

Admittedly, this is a tricky situation because, like much of what we have discussed thus far, there isn't one correct answer. For all the complaints against citations and the rigid rules surrounding them, there is something to be said for the discipline of learning these methods. It is entirely possible to turn the rules into guidelines, and write an incredible paper with and despite them. However, writing is not a one-size-fits-all process, and different approaches work for different people. I personally think there is real merit to be found in the citation styles, because I do find purpose in setting parameters.

Next up, we have a slightly older article, from 2000, The Popularity of Formulaic Writing (And Why We Need to Resist) by Mark Wiley. This article immediately seems to tie in well to the first selection, after all, what's more formulaic that citation styles?

Wiley immediately states his opinion that "formulaic writing is the actual villain in this classroom drama....it is the pedagogical blindness that formulaic writing leads to that disturbs me and that seems to be the real culprit" (61). He goes on to introduce Schaffer's approach to writing, a highly formulaic approach which feels quite familiar to me, as resembling the formula I leaned as a young student.

Wiley fairly highlights the strengths of Schaffer's approach as unifying students by having all focus on the same concepts-- repetitively and consistently, creating a unified front through all classrooms. This approach focuses on the importance of fact over opinion-- a key separation that will be crucial for students to understand throughout their academic lives. Schaffer's approach teaches that claims must be made and substantiated in very specific and clear-cut ways. At bare minimum, this formulaic method gives all students a rudimentary understanding of how to write an essay.

On the flip side, some find Schaffer's approach to be too bare-bones and stifling. Wiley cites one teacher as saying that students need to learn "writing fluency.....not simply learn how to fill out a form" (63). This is a fair criticism, the bare-bones approach can appear to be very much a skeleton with not much room left for growth. The essay is also supposed to be a flexible form, and Schaffer's method certainly doesn't appear to be flexible, despite, interestingly enough, Schaffer's own proclamation that "writing is an act of discovery" (qtd. in Wiley 64).

Once again, I'm conflicted in reacting to this article. Personally, I learned to write an essay using formulaic methods, and it never stopped me. Every essay I wrote throughout elementary and middle school was in the five paragraph structure: introduction, three topic sentences, conclusion. This structure was set in stone, but it didn't keep me from growing to love writing, and this might just be a situation in which those who are going to love writing will love it regardless, and those who don't, won't. One of the problematic things that Wiley mentions is that some students might learn this structure and cling to it forever, to which I respond, it's a good thing I didn't learn addition and subtraction and refuse to move on from that point in my mathematics education.

That being said, I get it. Structure is boring, dull, and rigid, and might not work for everyone. Wiley moves toward a more conceptual understanding of Schaffer's approach later in his article, as he cites James Collins, who has suggested that Schaffer's approach not be applied mechanically, but understood as a method that can be adapted to fit particular situations. Ultimately, I think this is the best way of looking at this dilemma. Similarly to what I said above, I think that structure and formula is important in learning, and once you know the method, you can work with it. Students, especially children, need parameters, and formulaic writing instruction may be one such parameter. That all being said, I'd be interested to hearing a counter approach to the formulaic method because there's always room for new ideas that will teach and serve the students in the best ways possible.








Formula and Tradition–Blog #9

I didn't know what to expect at the start of this Why the "Research Paper" Isn't Working (2011), considering how strongly I feel about the importance of research papers, but I found myself nodding in understanding with much of what author Barbara Fister had to say on the topic. A lot of the research paper process can translate as pointless and confusing rules, and much of this pointless confusion begins and ends with citations. At the start of her article, Fister links to a blog post that she wrote in 2009, called Manual Labor, in which she mourns the stupidity of the updated MLA and APA guidelines. One part of this article that particularly stood out to me was the following paragraph:
And what exactly are the learning outcomes of creating an error-free list of references? You learn that research is a pain in the butt. You learn that it’s really, really important to follow pointless rules with utter scrupulousness. You learn that, at the end of the day, you’ll get points off because you didn’t follow the pointless rules – unless, of course, you’re making a bundle off book sales, in which case “nonsignificant” is a valid defense.
Really though, if we're being honest, where is the lie? We've all had that that one professor. The type you're terrified of because s/he is the type to take away credit due to an incorrectly applied citation, or quotation style. We've all written research papers, done the research, and worried all the while that that one professor might focus too much on style over content. And most of us, as Fister points out, have thrown together the Works Cited page the night before the paper was due, with painstaking attention paid to every word for fear of being penalized for an incorrect citation style. If you stop to think about it, this does sound pretty ludicrous.

Going back to the assigned article, Fister makes another compelling point in saying:
The first year 'research paper' has always sent a mixed message. You’re supposed to be original, but must quote someone else to back up every point you make - while in constant fear that you’ll be accused of stealing from them.The obscure rules of citing sources only exacerbates the confusion and focuses attention on mechanics.
Fister suggests that students writing outside of the research paper structure have plenty to say because they aren't limited and find more personal satisfaction outside of the traditional conventions. She proposes that students learn enough to know the importance of finding sources and valid information, but suggests that the traditional research paper isn't the right way to go about presenting this information. She suggests, "If you want students to learn about a topic and be able to synthesize information effectively, fine – but don’t call it research. Turn it into a presentation, an informational brochure, or a Wikipedia article." She then notes an interesting counter to the traditional research paper, an idea presented by Nick Carbone, that students "first learn to write using sources the way people outside academia do—drawing them into the text as journalists and essayists do. The fussiness of citation rules can be left until students are writing something truly academic, in their junior or senior year."

Now, for my opinion. I think this is an interesting theory, and I think it could work for some students, particularly those who aren't going to care that much about style in the first place. Ultimately however, I feel the same way about this as I do about the importance of learning grammar in the classroom-- it's important. As an English major, I've had that one professor and by God, I'm grateful for her because, despite the hell she put me through, I learned how to format a paper. She taught me awareness, and she taught me that there are certain ways to do things. I don't think style should be judged over content, but it is important, and there is something to be said for tradition. The students who are going to care about strict attention to style will learn how to work with it, and those who need just survive the class will experience the true way of formatting a traditional paper.

Admittedly, this is a tricky situation because, like much of what we have discussed thus far, there isn't one correct answer. For all the complaints against citations and the rigid rules surrounding them, there is something to be said for the discipline of learning these methods. It is entirely possible to turn the rules into guidelines, and write an incredible paper with and despite them. However, writing is not a one-size-fits-all process, and different approaches work for different people. I personally think there is real merit to be found in the citation styles, because I do find purpose in setting parameters.

Next up, we have a slightly older article, from 2000, The Popularity of Formulaic Writing (And Why We Need to Resist) by Mark Wiley. This article immediately seems to tie in well to the first selection, after all, what's more formulaic that citation styles?

Wiley immediately states his opinion that "formulaic writing is the actual villain in this classroom drama....it is the pedagogical blindness that formulaic writing leads to that disturbs me and that seems to be the real culprit" (61). He goes on to introduce Schaffer's approach to writing, a highly formulaic approach which feels quite familiar to me, as resembling the formula I leaned as a young student.

Wiley fairly highlights the strengths of Schaffer's approach as unifying students by having all focus on the same concepts-- repetitively and consistently, creating a unified front through all classrooms. This approach focuses on the importance of fact over opinion-- a key separation that will be crucial for students to understand throughout their academic lives. Schaffer's approach teaches that claims must be made and substantiated in very specific and clear-cut ways. At bare minimum, this formulaic method gives all students a rudimentary understanding of how to write an essay.

On the flip side, some find Schaffer's approach to be too bare-bones and stifling. Wiley cites one teacher as saying that students need to learn "writing fluency.....not simply learn how to fill out a form" (63). This is a fair criticism, the bare-bones approach can appear to be very much a skeleton with not much room left for growth. The essay is also supposed to be a flexible form, and Schaffer's method certainly doesn't appear to be flexible, despite, interestingly enough, Schaffer's own proclamation that "writing is an act of discovery" (qtd. in Wiley 64).

Once again, I'm conflicted in reacting to this article. Personally, I learned to write an essay using formulaic methods, and it never stopped me. Every essay I wrote throughout elementary and middle school was in the five paragraph structure: introduction, three topic sentences, conclusion. This structure was set in stone, but it didn't keep me from growing to love writing, and this might just be a situation in which those who are going to love writing will love it regardless, and those who don't, won't. One of the problematic things that Wiley mentions is that some students might learn this structure and cling to it forever, to which I respond, it's a good thing I didn't learn addition and subtraction and refuse to move on from that point in my mathematics education.

That being said, I get it. Structure is boring, dull, and rigid, and might not work for everyone. Wiley moves toward a more conceptual understanding of Schaffer's approach later in his article, as he cites James Collins, who has suggested that Schaffer's approach not be applied mechanically, but understood as a method that can be adapted to fit particular situations. Ultimately, I think this is the best way of looking at this dilemma. Similarly to what I said above, I think that structure and formula is important in learning, and once you know the method, you can work with it. Students, especially children, need parameters, and formulaic writing instruction may be one such parameter. That all being said, I'd be interested to hearing a counter approach to the formulaic method because there's always room for new ideas that will teach and serve the students in the best ways possible.








Tools to Inspire (Student) Writers

#WhyIWrite - An Introduction

"Moses said to the Lord, ‘Pardon your servant, Lord. I have never been eloquent, neither in the past nor since you have spoken to your servant. I am slow of speech and tongue.’ The Lord said to him, ‘Who gave human beings their mouths? Who makes them deaf or mute? Who gives them sight or makes them blind? Is it not I, the Lord? Now go; I will help you speak and will teach you what to say.’” Exodus 4:10-12

I write because, from a young age, writing is how I am best able to express my feelings and communicate with others. I have always struggled to have the confidence to speak in front of people, a limitation I am slowly fighting to overcome, but I have always been able to communicate through writing. I believe God gives us gifts, and I feel that writing is the gift that has been given to me. I write to communicate, and believe that words are power. Because the ability to write has helped me so much in my life, I want to share this gift with other students.

My #WhyIWrite project is a list of strategies and ideas for teachers looking for new ways to help and inspire their students-- those who love writing, and those who do not. Although this list is directed at teachers looking to inspire their students, I believe that writers of all ages and stages will find it to be a wonderful compilation of resources. Let's begin!

Strategy #1: Grammar Review

Teachers can take for granted that all students are on the same level of understanding grammar and basic writing skills when, in reality, this may be far from the truth. In a college classroom, the students are coming from various backgrounds, and the best place to begin is with basic grammar. Here is a review of basic grammar from Cayuga Community College, prepared by Professor James Delaney.

Another fantastic tool for anyone interested in refreshing their knowledge of grammar is The Gremlins of Grammar by Toni Boyle and K.D. Sullivan. This book is both engaging and educational, and deserves a spot on every bookshelf in the world. It is particularly excellent for students who need to refresh their grammar, but find traditional instructional methods to be incomprehensible and dry (sorry, Strunk and White).

By starting on the ground floor, each student should feel that they are prepared to tackle what comes next-- the actual writing. At best, the students who are unfamiliar with basic grammatical rules will have the opportunity to learn. At worst, the students who already have an understanding of English grammar will be able to refresh their knowledge.
If you or your students are interested in the “why” beyond some grammar rules, than Mignon Fogarty, a.k.a. Grammar Girl, is the girl for you. Her blogs and podcasts cover topics such as the difference between affect and effect, used to vs. use to, and who vs. whom. Whether you’re writing a paper, or are just curious about the intricacies of the English language, Mignon probably has the answer.

Strategy #2: Structure Review

Much like grammar, we often are quick to assume that students are all on the same page in knowing how an essay (of any kind) is structured. While I had the five paragraph essay format hammered into my head at a young age, I cannot assume that each of my readers (or students) have had the same experience.

The following link includes a wealth of guiding information from Dr. Randy Rambo, of Illinois Valley Community College, regarding the basic steps of composing an essay. It also helpfully includes samples.


In addition to essay writing guidelines, Rambo also provides a detailed explanation of punctuation and grammar, stylistic matters, writing with sources, and more.

Strategy #3: Writing is Crucial to All Majors

“I’m not an English major, I’m an [insert major here].  I don’t need to know how to write well.” This ever-popular straw man argument against writing classes is often heard uttered from the lips of students disinterested in writing, but forced into it by course requirements.  In reality, the ability to write and communicate well is as crucial for every major as the ability to do basic addition and subtraction. As true as it is that writing is crucial to students of all disciplines, this truth is not necessarily going to be embraced by every computer science or engineering major who could easily question when they’ll need writing skills in their respective fields.

For some people, examples are key. Below I have listed three articles from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and Forbes, all dates from within the past five years, stating the importance of writing skills in the workplace.


Strategy #4: Make it Fun!

As someone who has been immersed in grammatical studies all my life, it is easy for me to slash at a paper full of egregious grammatical or spelling errors. While the correction of such things does certainly have its place, it is important to remember that such things can be disheartening to students. It can be easy to forget that to many students, the intricacies of grammar only matter in dusty, old textbooks and bear no relevance to reality. In this case, a relevant example can make all of the difference in the world-- after all, don’t discount the importance of fun! Before jumping into the serious stuff, an intro like the following can be a great way to get students’ toes wet. These lessons examine such things as metaphor, visual representation, and speaker/audience relationships, all of which are important to understand in the student’s own writing.


For the sake of holding students’ attention, I would recommend a quiz or worksheet in addition to this video, but I recommend it as an entertaining, relevant way to introduce the importance of analysis.


Strategy #5: The Internet is Your Friend

“Teacher knows best.” Although the traditional classroom approach may have once supported this impression, we now have tools that can eliminate this antiquated philosophy entirely. The internet provides a wealth of information, and much of it is completely free! In addition to free-of-charge information, writing inspiration and tools for writers are also widely available.

One quick Pinterest search led me to this list of fantastic resources for writers along each step of the writing journey. One in particular that stood out to me was Stellar, which allows users to tell their story with pictures and videos, alongside text. Some students are more visual than others, and this is a cool way to incite their interest. Although it would not work for every paper expected in a freshman comp class (i.e. research papers), it could be an exciting thing to incorporate in a short story or memoir. Students need to see that writing while crucially practical, is not limited to professional settings.


Strategy #6: Inspiration

The best way to learn is by doing, and the best way to learn writing is to write. However, how do you know what to write about? One-size-fits-all prompts aren’t meant for everyone, and might give students the ability to say, “I didn’t know how to respond.” In this day and age, that’s no longer than excuse, evidenced by the existence of sites such as Writing Exercises, and their Random Subject Generator. In addition to the subject generator, the site has functions such as Random First Line prompts, Random Plot Generator (if you were looking for a story idea), and Random Scenario. No more excuses!

Another way to inspire students is to encourage them to use their own platforms to find writing inspiration. Sites like Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook are filled with groups and accounts dedicated to inspirational quotes to respond to, and writing prompts-- they’re only one quick search away.


Conclusion


Considering the amount of inspiration and helpful resources that the internet has to offer, there is no longer any reason for writing to be considered boring or irrelevant. This article covers a lot of resources, and this is only a small fraction that the internet has to offer. I have learned so much through my findings, and I hope you have as well. It is my most sincere hope that you use these resources for yourself and your students, and find success in encouraging young minds to write.

Tools to Inspire (Student) Writers

#WhyIWrite - An Introduction

"Moses said to the Lord, ‘Pardon your servant, Lord. I have never been eloquent, neither in the past nor since you have spoken to your servant. I am slow of speech and tongue.’ The Lord said to him, ‘Who gave human beings their mouths? Who makes them deaf or mute? Who gives them sight or makes them blind? Is it not I, the Lord? Now go; I will help you speak and will teach you what to say.’” Exodus 4:10-12

I write because, from a young age, writing is how I am best able to express my feelings and communicate with others. I have always struggled to have the confidence to speak in front of people, a limitation I am slowly fighting to overcome, but I have always been able to communicate through writing. I believe God gives us gifts, and I feel that writing is the gift that has been given to me. I write to communicate, and believe that words are power. Because the ability to write has helped me so much in my life, I want to share this gift with other students.

My #WhyIWrite project is a list of strategies and ideas for teachers looking for new ways to help and inspire their students-- those who love writing, and those who do not. Although this list is directed at teachers looking to inspire their students, I believe that writers of all ages and stages will find it to be a wonderful compilation of resources. Let's begin!

Strategy #1: Grammar Review

Teachers can take for granted that all students are on the same level of understanding grammar and basic writing skills when, in reality, this may be far from the truth. In a college classroom, the students are coming from various backgrounds, and the best place to begin is with basic grammar. Here is a review of basic grammar from Cayuga Community College, prepared by Professor James Delaney.

Another fantastic tool for anyone interested in refreshing their knowledge of grammar is The Gremlins of Grammar by Toni Boyle and K.D. Sullivan. This book is both engaging and educational, and deserves a spot on every bookshelf in the world. It is particularly excellent for students who need to refresh their grammar, but find traditional instructional methods to be incomprehensible and dry (sorry, Strunk and White).

By starting on the ground floor, each student should feel that they are prepared to tackle what comes next-- the actual writing. At best, the students who are unfamiliar with basic grammatical rules will have the opportunity to learn. At worst, the students who already have an understanding of English grammar will be able to refresh their knowledge.
If you or your students are interested in the “why” beyond some grammar rules, than Mignon Fogarty, a.k.a. Grammar Girl, is the girl for you. Her blogs and podcasts cover topics such as the difference between affect and effect, used to vs. use to, and who vs. whom. Whether you’re writing a paper, or are just curious about the intricacies of the English language, Mignon probably has the answer.

Strategy #2: Structure Review

Much like grammar, we often are quick to assume that students are all on the same page in knowing how an essay (of any kind) is structured. While I had the five paragraph essay format hammered into my head at a young age, I cannot assume that each of my readers (or students) have had the same experience.

The following link includes a wealth of guiding information from Dr. Randy Rambo, of Illinois Valley Community College, regarding the basic steps of composing an essay. It also helpfully includes samples.


In addition to essay writing guidelines, Rambo also provides a detailed explanation of punctuation and grammar, stylistic matters, writing with sources, and more.

Strategy #3: Writing is Crucial to All Majors

“I’m not an English major, I’m an [insert major here].  I don’t need to know how to write well.” This ever-popular straw man argument against writing classes is often heard uttered from the lips of students disinterested in writing, but forced into it by course requirements.  In reality, the ability to write and communicate well is as crucial for every major as the ability to do basic addition and subtraction. As true as it is that writing is crucial to students of all disciplines, this truth is not necessarily going to be embraced by every computer science or engineering major who could easily question when they’ll need writing skills in their respective fields.

For some people, examples are key. Below I have listed three articles from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and Forbes, all dates from within the past five years, stating the importance of writing skills in the workplace.


Strategy #4: Make it Fun!

As someone who has been immersed in grammatical studies all my life, it is easy for me to slash at a paper full of egregious grammatical or spelling errors. While the correction of such things does certainly have its place, it is important to remember that such things can be disheartening to students. It can be easy to forget that to many students, the intricacies of grammar only matter in dusty, old textbooks and bear no relevance to reality. In this case, a relevant example can make all of the difference in the world-- after all, don’t discount the importance of fun! Before jumping into the serious stuff, an intro like the following can be a great way to get students’ toes wet. These lessons examine such things as metaphor, visual representation, and speaker/audience relationships, all of which are important to understand in the student’s own writing.


For the sake of holding students’ attention, I would recommend a quiz or worksheet in addition to this video, but I recommend it as an entertaining, relevant way to introduce the importance of analysis.


Strategy #5: The Internet is Your Friend

“Teacher knows best.” Although the traditional classroom approach may have once supported this impression, we now have tools that can eliminate this antiquated philosophy entirely. The internet provides a wealth of information, and much of it is completely free! In addition to free-of-charge information, writing inspiration and tools for writers are also widely available.

One quick Pinterest search led me to this list of fantastic resources for writers along each step of the writing journey. One in particular that stood out to me was Stellar, which allows users to tell their story with pictures and videos, alongside text. Some students are more visual than others, and this is a cool way to incite their interest. Although it would not work for every paper expected in a freshman comp class (i.e. research papers), it could be an exciting thing to incorporate in a short story or memoir. Students need to see that writing while crucially practical, is not limited to professional settings.


Strategy #6: Inspiration

The best way to learn is by doing, and the best way to learn writing is to write. However, how do you know what to write about? One-size-fits-all prompts aren’t meant for everyone, and might give students the ability to say, “I didn’t know how to respond.” In this day and age, that’s no longer than excuse, evidenced by the existence of sites such as Writing Exercises, and their Random Subject Generator. In addition to the subject generator, the site has functions such as Random First Line prompts, Random Plot Generator (if you were looking for a story idea), and Random Scenario. No more excuses!

Another way to inspire students is to encourage them to use their own platforms to find writing inspiration. Sites like Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook are filled with groups and accounts dedicated to inspirational quotes to respond to, and writing prompts-- they’re only one quick search away.


Conclusion


Considering the amount of inspiration and helpful resources that the internet has to offer, there is no longer any reason for writing to be considered boring or irrelevant. This article covers a lot of resources, and this is only a small fraction that the internet has to offer. I have learned so much through my findings, and I hope you have as well. It is my most sincere hope that you use these resources for yourself and your students, and find success in encouraging young minds to write.

Your #WhyIWrite Project & the final few weeks…

images-3Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

We had a very productive workshop during last class, and I think we now have the website “shell” for your final collaborative project, along with a kind of template for what you need to input there in order for the whole collaboration to really come together. Here is the link to the files associated with the organization of materials for your final project.  Please remember that by next class you need to have completed:

a URL for your final draft (**When editing, please keep in mind the feedback received from last week’s peer review session.)

an image for your bio (whatever image you like, does not need to be personal photo)

your bio (3-4 sentences)

a short author statement (a quote or short statement – this is optional)

an image for the “gateway” or “entry click” to your work

***Please drop all of this information into the files in the shared folder.

For next week:

UnknownKatherine will be leading discussion with “Why the Research Paper is Not Working (Fister) & “The Popularity of Formulaic Writing (and Why We Need to Resist)” (Wiley).  Please read this material and blog your reflection on the work.

We will use the second half of class to:

1. Address the final steps for completing the collaborative project/website.

2. Brainstorm & decide upon four questions for the #digiwrimo  #whyiwrite webchat from 6-7pm on 12/5.

See you all soon,

Dr. Zamora

 

 

Blog 8: My Memo Questions

My Memo Questions
 1. How can I keep my readers of all ages fully engaged ? 
2. What is my best platform to use for my project? 
3. Concern I must have all of my Power point with all features interactive and embedded. I'm a loyal PPT consumer
4. Concern how can I improve my content with only getting rid of little to no content.
5. How do you feel as a potential audience member while considering my piece? Is something missing? What can make it more enjoyable.

Blog 8: My Memo Questions

My Memo Questions
 1. How can I keep my readers of all ages fully engaged ? 
2. What is my best platform to use for my project? 
3. Concern I must have all of my Power point with all features interactive and embedded. I'm a loyal PPT consumer
4. Concern how can I improve my content with only getting rid of little to no content.
5. How do you feel as a potential audience member while considering my piece? Is something missing? What can make it more enjoyable.

#WhyIWrite Peer Review Blog

why-i-write

I feel I so far behind in my progression for my final project, but I am trying my best to get everything in order and done. I was struggling for quite a while with my concept. I finally settles on a topic that might be hard to talk about sometimes, but offers immense insight and perspective into the lives of others. Below I will attach a link to my work and the five questions that I came up with for my group members.

 

Breaking the Manacles

 

  1. Do my visuals effectively communicate the message I’m trying to convey within each poem? If so, in what way(s)?
  1. Does wix seem to be an adequate platform to house my project? If not, explain and possible suggest tool you know that could help achieve what I am trying to do in a better way.
  1. What are some of the ways in which I may be able to make this piece even more interactive?
  1. Can you see how my theme connects to writing theory regarding voice and self in writing? In what ways can it be improved or altered?
  1. As a reader/navigator of this piece, what are some of your visceral reactions? (your responses may help me to locate any glitches within the pice that I would have to rectify.