Blog #10: Connected Learning and Writing Assessment

Connected Learning and Writing Assessment
By Andaiye Hall

I am no stranger to connected learning. This past summer I had an introduction to this whole new world of incorporating digital literacy. I believe that the best people to do writing assessment would be people with no ego and open minds. I think even though these people exist it can be very hard to find them. If you are lucky to find someone with an open mind they could still have an ego to go with that or vice versa. It goes both ways so I think that we are no where near to discovering the ideal writing assessment. As much as technology is developing we still need humans behind the computer. As long as humans are involved they are perfectly imperfect so we are highly unlikely to have fully fair assessments made. Someone always think they know more than someone else and that id not true. We are all still growing and learning.

Blog #10: Connected Learning and Writing Assessment

Connected Learning and Writing Assessment
By Andaiye Hall

I am no stranger to connected learning. This past summer I had an introduction to this whole new world of incorporating digital literacy. I believe that the best people to do writing assessment would be people with no ego and open minds. I think even though these people exist it can be very hard to find them. If you are lucky to find someone with an open mind they could still have an ego to go with that or vice versa. It goes both ways so I think that we are no where near to discovering the ideal writing assessment. As much as technology is developing we still need humans behind the computer. As long as humans are involved they are perfectly imperfect so we are highly unlikely to have fully fair assessments made. Someone always think they know more than someone else and that id not true. We are all still growing and learning.

Blog #9: Research Papers Need to Have Variety

Research Papers Need to Have Variety
By Andaiye Hall

I like the ideas that the writers of Why the Research Paper isn’t working. I wish more educators would strongly consider his proposal/argument. I experience so much more joy and enthusiasm by writing about what I love rather than any random topic. Sometimes however, there are times that I discover I have new found areas that in particular really interest me. So maybe the author’s idea could be a little too over-expansive. I think a research paper every now and again outside your comfort zone is helpful. The primary thing is that student should be interested and engaged. I also believe that for an author to come out with such an opinionated article he should have used demonstrated facts.

Blog #9: Research Papers Need to Have Variety

Research Papers Need to Have Variety
By Andaiye Hall

I like the ideas that the writers of Why the Research Paper isn’t working. I wish more educators would strongly consider his proposal/argument. I experience so much more joy and enthusiasm by writing about what I love rather than any random topic. Sometimes however, there are times that I discover I have new found areas that in particular really interest me. So maybe the author’s idea could be a little too over-expansive. I think a research paper every now and again outside your comfort zone is helpful. The primary thing is that student should be interested and engaged. I also believe that for an author to come out with such an opinionated article he should have used demonstrated facts.

Our plan for our final class!

imagesWe have finally made it to the finish line of the semester, as we plan for our final class next week!  I look forward to our potluck dinner, so please sign up to add to our menu for our final class party together.

I had a great time during our #DigiWriMo twitterchat, and I think our questions spurned some thoughtful collective reflection.  I also enjoyed the playful aspects of our conversation (especially the thought of a course on the Semiotics of Emoji use in varying local subcultures 😉 – there was definitely some LOL moments.  NWP colleague Keving Hodgson (aka @dogtrax) was kind enough to create a storify of our social/public conversation.  Please check it out!:

Thanks to Hope for having us read and view our final selections for the semester: the video – “Writing as Making/Making as Writing by Connected Learning TV“ and the article – “Writing Assessment in the Early 21st Century” by K. B Yancey.  We closed our semester long conversation on writing process with a consideration of Yancey’s 4th wave of writing assessment.  Then we turned to thinking about different pathways to writing – though the Connected Learning lens of “Writing-as-Making”.  Unknown-1I am glad we closed up the semester long conversation with the frame of production-centered learning in order to shed new light on writing experiences.  Writing-as-Making leads to the discovery of new pathways for writerly identity.  The “maker” sensibility is an exciting opening, loosening up the constriction often felt for students when it comes to learning how to write.  To think of writing-as-making (especially in a digital 21st century environment) means to embrace a “tinkering” sensibility.  Students can create and make without a script or formulaic set of instructions.  Students can be transformed from consumers of media to producers of media.  And when something doesn’t work, students can figure out “work arounds” until they get to a place of new understanding, building an important resiliency in the midst of learning.  “Making” yields a kind of persistence, and helps combat a pervasive fear of failure that is so much a part of the typical schooling experience.  I enjoyed your blogs for this week, and they highlighted to me the enthusiasm you feel for connected learning principles, and what these ideas can do for writing students in this day and age.

For our final class:

-Remember to plan and bring your potluck contribution.

Remember to complete your final class portfolio and send it to me via email.

Be prepared to co-write the “About” page for your final class project, while we eat and celebrate the close of the Fall semester.  🙂

Thanks for a fantastic semester with all of you.  I can’t believe how it just flew by….

xo

Dr. Zamora

Ps.  Our final class party is open to friends, family and anyone you feel inclined to share with :).

 

Creating a New Environment 2016-12-05 19:46:00

Hope Wilson

Eng. 5020

Dr. Zamora

Writing Theory & Practice

Presentation

 

                                                                “To Test or Not To Test”
By Yancey, Kathleen Blake & Ritter, Kelly and Matsuda, Paul “Exploring Composition Studies”

 

          Are the students being taught to pass a test or are the educators’ writing assessment and curriculums being presented? Developing a relationship with a student is part of the educational process. Writing assessment is one of ways that creates communication between a teacher and a student. I agree with Yancey when she  writes “ The test were indirect measures, that is, a test that sampled something related to but other than the individual student’s writing, typically a multiple choice test of editing skills serving as a proxy for writing” that cannot replace an educator’s assessment of multiple writings. Acknowledging the fact that test and processes requires money and sitting several hundred students in a room to take a test that a machine can grade is far less expensive than having an educator evaluate one student at a time.

       Who are the most qualified to make these decisions, the educators, test experts, school administrators, or the scholars? Some may agree that all of them are qualified. There have been many processes suggested regarding the teaching and the evaluation of writing. Scholars, teachers, researchers, and test experts have all weigh in to assist with implementing a fair assessment. External reviews have been an enormous concern by some. Some educators value their curriculum and insist on enforcing it.

        During the three waves there have been multiple processes, tests implemented, many evaluations regarding the improvement of writing and writing assessment. I agree that accumulatively all of them improve writing skills. Reflection and self-assessment encourage students to evaluate themselves by taking a closer look at their work by proof reading. The school administrator testing creates an environment of continuous focus as it reveals other options the students may not had considered. The portfolio creates the proof of progress and the capability of certain projects. The presentation of accumulative work also increases the reflection and self-assessment. Reading and comprehension definitely increases writing and public speaking.

       Future writers will seek out their needed skills at their convenience. Students that are not interested in writing will write for a desired grade. There are many applications and online programs assisting writers to improve their craft. Social media tools. Audio, video, and online classes are available to assist writers improve their craft. Educators become engaged to improve their skills and teach students how to improve their passion. They also encourage a platform for children to share their work as they provide technology to improve literacy. They share knowledge, processes, and curriculums. Peer review groups are encouraged. It can provide a great experience for future writers to​begin accepting criticism.

 

 

                                                                    

how the maker movement can help create writers

I really enjoyed the video and reading paired together this week, because I think it’s completely important and relevant in the next steps toward teaching writing. I think this is that “fourth wave” that Yancey reflects on, the next movement in writing assessment in education. While the third wave is still portfolio-based and tries to be more creative, I think that if writing assessment moves toward that DIY-ideology that the DML webinar discusses, it will work a lot better for students. If students gain more control over their work in both a creative and multimodal context, writing can become more individualized and accessible to a variety of students.

It’s significant to recognize the maker movement as something that can also be applied to the teaching of writing, and is not just exclusive to engineers or people who have “left-sided” brains. If we create makerspaces that cater toward developing writing skills, such as including kinesthetic methods of teaching writing instead of all just visual or auditory, it appeals to another type of thinker. That way, writing can reach out toward a multitude of students and instill confidence in people who think they inherently “are not good writers” – there should be no such thing. Learning comes to people a variety of ways, and makerspaces and DIY projects help include that neurodiversity.

Consequently, besides just helping develop the student as a writer, a DIY approach can be applied to writing assessments in school. Elyse Eidman-Aadahl mentions that writing assessments are completely formulaic and “not natural” environment for cultivating writing. Thus, if the next wave of writing assessment transforms into a process that encourages a more “studio” atmosphere, it is ultimately better for the student. That way, the student becomes more involved in their writing: it becomes a subject they are interested in, and this interest will hopefully breed the potential for their writing project to reach an actual audience. It all goes back to this culture of attribution, and if students are creating, are making, there’s a feeling of success and self-worth by adding their voice in an ongoing or completely new conversation.

In that sense, writing assessments have the potential to be more than just a dreaded thing that a student has to “pass.” Instead, it can become an opportunity for students to express and explore themselves and their writing and subjects that interest them, in order to further their personal and academic curiosities and abilities.

how the maker movement can help create writers

I really enjoyed the video and reading paired together this week, because I think it’s completely important and relevant in the next steps toward teaching writing. I think this is that “fourth wave” that Yancey reflects on, the next movement in writing assessment in education. While the third wave is still portfolio-based and tries to be more creative, I think that if writing assessment moves toward that DIY-ideology that the DML webinar discusses, it will work a lot better for students. If students gain more control over their work in both a creative and multimodal context, writing can become more individualized and accessible to a variety of students.

It’s significant to recognize the maker movement as something that can also be applied to the teaching of writing, and is not just exclusive to engineers or people who have “left-sided” brains. If we create makerspaces that cater toward developing writing skills, such as including kinesthetic methods of teaching writing instead of all just visual or auditory, it appeals to another type of thinker. That way, writing can reach out toward a multitude of students and instill confidence in people who think they inherently “are not good writers” – there should be no such thing. Learning comes to people a variety of ways, and makerspaces and DIY projects help include that neurodiversity.

Consequently, besides just helping develop the student as a writer, a DIY approach can be applied to writing assessments in school. Elyse Eidman-Aadahl mentions that writing assessments are completely formulaic and “not natural” environment for cultivating writing. Thus, if the next wave of writing assessment transforms into a process that encourages a more “studio” atmosphere, it is ultimately better for the student. That way, the student becomes more involved in their writing: it becomes a subject they are interested in, and this interest will hopefully breed the potential for their writing project to reach an actual audience. It all goes back to this culture of attribution, and if students are creating, are making, there’s a feeling of success and self-worth by adding their voice in an ongoing or completely new conversation.

In that sense, writing assessments have the potential to be more than just a dreaded thing that a student has to “pass.” Instead, it can become an opportunity for students to express and explore themselves and their writing and subjects that interest them, in order to further their personal and academic curiosities and abilities.

Creating a New Environment 2016-12-05 19:46:00

Hope Wilson

Eng. 5020

Dr. Zamora

Writing Theory & Practice

Presentation

 

                                                                “To Test or Not To Test”
By Yancey, Kathleen Blake & Ritter, Kelly and Matsuda, Paul “Exploring Composition Studies”

 

          Are the students being taught to pass a test or are the educators’ writing assessment and curriculums being presented? Developing a relationship with a student is part of the educational process. Writing assessment is one of ways that creates communication between a teacher and a student. I agree with Yancey when she  writes “ The test were indirect measures, that is, a test that sampled something related to but other than the individual student’s writing, typically a multiple choice test of editing skills serving as a proxy for writing” that cannot replace an educator’s assessment of multiple writings. Acknowledging the fact that test and processes requires money and sitting several hundred students in a room to take a test that a machine can grade is far less expensive than having an educator evaluate one student at a time.

       Who are the most qualified to make these decisions, the educators, test experts, school administrators, or the scholars? Some may agree that all of them are qualified. There have been many processes suggested regarding the teaching and the evaluation of writing. Scholars, teachers, researchers, and test experts have all weigh in to assist with implementing a fair assessment. External reviews have been an enormous concern by some. Some educators value their curriculum and insist on enforcing it.

        During the three waves there have been multiple processes, tests implemented, many evaluations regarding the improvement of writing and writing assessment. I agree that accumulatively all of them improve writing skills. Reflection and self-assessment encourage students to evaluate themselves by taking a closer look at their work by proof reading. The school administrator testing creates an environment of continuous focus as it reveals other options the students may not had considered. The portfolio creates the proof of progress and the capability of certain projects. The presentation of accumulative work also increases the reflection and self-assessment. Reading and comprehension definitely increases writing and public speaking.

       Future writers will seek out their needed skills at their convenience. Students that are not interested in writing will write for a desired grade. There are many applications and online programs assisting writers to improve their craft. Social media tools. Audio, video, and online classes are available to assist writers improve their craft. Educators become engaged to improve their skills and teach students how to improve their passion. They also encourage a platform for children to share their work as they provide technology to improve literacy. They share knowledge, processes, and curriculums. Peer review groups are encouraged. It can provide a great experience for future writers to​begin accepting criticism.

 

 

                                                                    

Writing as Making/Making as Writing

make-writing

The materials for this week occupied both ends of the spectrum for me. I was dreadfully bored by the twenty-two page article Kathleen Yancey decided to write, where she touches on the three waves of writing regarding writing assessment. Not only did I have a deja vu moment because we read her article about historicizing writing that basically said the same thing, but I also lost all interest in that moment to continue. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the video about writing as making and so my post today with mostly center around that topic.

Although there were areas where the discussion dragged in the video because of weak internet connections and not all of the panel members being there consistently throughout, I felt the conversation about writing as making/making as writing was very successful. Elise offered some very insightful comments about the work that she does and the concept of writing as making in general that really set the tone for the entire discussion. I made many connections to the discussions that we have had in class as well, and I think that that says something about the teaching of writing and how it is incorporated into the classroom. It is good to know that these conversations are present in college classrooms before the material is even introduced.

I feel the message the movement is trying to convey (to refrain from solely consuming, and instead participate incarnation) resonates with me because it is a creed that I have had for my life since I was a young girl. I never really thought much about my consuming the books I was reading, but rather focused on how I could get to the point where I’d be the writer of them. I guess i was a few steps ahead then, but I am grateful for that mindset that I held because it got me to where I am now. The very idea that I have been repeating all semester of getting student’s interested in what they are producing and creating a context for them to feel like they’re voice/work matters is exactly what Andrew touched on. I was excited to be hearing my very words uttered in different words.

What I found very interesting was the segment that touched on identity. Elise made a note that a student’s writer identity is something that is gained over time and I absolutely agree. Usually, one does not come to terms with themselves as writers until much later in their writing lives. In their younger years, student writers are not that confident, but I think that in time that can be rectified. I really liked what Elise said about intelligence persistence through iteration. I tis important to get student writers into that frame of mind where they have a sort of respect and appreciation for the revision process. Celebrating the beginning stages of a work and its drafts are just as important as praise for the final result. Also, students are going to feel empowered and feel motivated to be themselves and grow authentically into their writing identity when given the opportunity and safe “space” to be able to. These communities and subcultures invented on the web and in areas like DIY.org etc. are where it starts.