Tag Archives: writing

Let’s play a game…. Unraveling Poetry

(An Experimental Piece)

Welcome aboard Poetry Quest, where words become your compass and poetry is the map! In this game, you’ll embark on a journey through the vast seas of language, exploring different poetic forms and unlocking the mysteries of verse. Are you ready to set sail and discover the wonders that await?

Objective: To complete each level by solving word puzzles and creating poetry that fits the given prompt. As you progress, you’ll unlock new challenges and poetic forms to explore.

Level 1: Rhyme Riddles

In this level, you’ll encounter rhyming riddles that describe common objects or concepts. Your task is to decipher the riddle and write a short poem using the clues provided. Be sure to include words that rhyme with the given clues to unlock the next level!

Example Riddle:

I’m tall and green, with leaves so wide,

I sway in the breeze, with grace and pride.

My trunk is strong, my branches high,

In forests deep, I touch the sky.

—>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Level 2: Acrostic Adventure

In this level, you’ll be challenged to create an acrostic poem using a given word or phrase. Each line of your poem should begin with the corresponding letter of the word or phrase. Get creative and see how many unique acrostic poems you can compose!

Example Word: SUNSHINE

S pirits lifted by your golden glow,

U nderneath your warmth, we grow.

N ature’s canvas painted bright,

S parkling rays fill the day and night.

H earts are warmed by your embrace,

I lluminating every space.

N estled in your light, we find,

E ternal joy and peace of mind.

—>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Level 3: Haiku Harmony

In this level, you’ll delve into the world of haiku poetry. Your challenge is to write a haiku inspired by the given theme or image. Remember, a haiku consists of three lines with a 5-7-5 syllable pattern. Let your imagination soar as you capture the essence of the moment in just a few words!

Example Theme: Spring Blossoms

Cherry blossoms bloom,

Petals drift on gentle breeze,

Nature’s silent song.

—>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Level 4: Sonnet Solace

Prepare to tackle the Sonnet Solace challenge! Craft a sonnet following the traditional 14-line structure with iambic pentameter. Explore themes of love, loss, or beauty as you weave together intricate rhyme schemes and deep sentiments.

Example Opening Lines:

In twilight’s embrace, the day takes flight,

As shadows lengthen and stars ignite.

—>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Thank you for completing Poetry Quest! We hope you enjoyed this wordplay adventure and discovered the joy of poetry along the way. Keep exploring, keep writing, keep creating, and let your words carry you to new horizons!

Discourse Analysis & Research Proposal Update

Update on Research Proposal Process:

Hey guys,

So, I decided taking on Tyler’s bullet-point approach to my own blog posts as the semester is ending and my focus and attention is now directed more toward refining my research question and writing my research proposal draft. As of right now, I have written a very “rough” draft of my thesis proposal, now skimming through my selected sources, noticing when and where my ideas can be supported and backed by prior research. My rough draft is kind of all over the place, which seems to be okay at this point of the research process. I have so many tabs open, constantly going back and forth, trying to remember which article I read and cited. Refining research is a frustrating process, but as I slowly get more work done, I feel my notes and ideas are aligning and making more sense.

For now, I paused on writing my proposal draft, as I was feeling hesitant about my sources, and worrying if my research process will come together. Now I’m diving deeper into my research sources to work on my literature review. This way, I can have a better understanding and overview of each source that will drive my research inquiry forward. As for Thursday’s class, I’ll have a terrible rough draft of my thesis proposal, and a quarter of my literature review done. ~~ Baby steps, people, baby steps ~~

Response on Discourse Analysis:

The research article, Discourse Analysis: Making Complex Methodology Simple by Bondarouk and Ruël talks about the emergence of information systems (IS), and how recent research studies have showed an interest in discourse analysis. Discourse analysis goes hand-in-hand in understanding the inner-workings behind IS and the behavior associated with handling information technologies as their purpose is to essentially collect, store, decode, process, and transmit digital information to make meaning and understanding.

  • The article is straightforward, stating the authors concerns in the “‘universal’ relationships between variables in the social reality” (Bandarouk & Ruël, 2004). The authors central focus of concern is behind the data collection and decoding process of interpretative studies, especially ones that utilize quantitative methods of data collection. The positive paradigm of research is referenced all throughout the article, which relies on measurement and reason from an observable activity, action, or reason to make generalizable inferences.
  • I guess my question here, would be is the predominance of positivism among IS studies a good or bad thing? Because, as a novice researcher, I truly don’t know. All I do know is that Bandarouk & Ruël illustrate the multidisciplinary origins of “what actually constitutes ‘discourse’ and elaborate on the main principles of conducing discourse analysis in IS studies” (2004). The authors also go as far as to demonstrate an eight-step mode or guide for conducting discourse analysis for interpretative IS studies. Which, I assume is the author’s attempt at making discourse analysis a more simplified research methodology.
  • Truly, I’m still confused on this whole discourse analysis approach to interpretive studies. So, I did some research outside of the assigned article. Of course, I looked up a working definition of discourse analysis, one in which I can understand and apply to this article. According to Emerald Publishing, the Oxford English Dictionary defines discourse analysis as: “Linguistics, a method of analyzing the structure of texts or utterances longer than one sentence, taking into account both their linguistic content and their sociolinguistic context; analysis performed using this method.” I would assume the ‘interpretive’ portion of this decoding approach would involve reading in between the lines for deeper meaning.
  • I was also confused on the term “positivism,” in which the authors reference a lot throughout the article. When I researched “positivism among IS studies,” what came up was the word naturalism. Or, the view that only factual knowledge is gained through observation (the senses), including measurement, is trustworthy. Therefore, it seems to be that the discourse analysis approach must consider the principles of both nature and science when trying to extract valid information by an observed phenomenon.
  • Obviously, research paradigms guide scientific discoveries through assumptions and principles based off how the world operates. Therefore, the eight-step mode of discourse analysis is practical in its application process for novice researchers trying to understand or attempt a discourse analysis method approach. Although I’m still confused on this whole discourse analysis method-approach (one in which sounds tedious and complex), I can leave knowing that the first theoretical implication, or step one is “identifying a theory” (2004). From that point onward, the researcher must transcribe the interviews, always checking whether the words (or collected data) are in line with the proposed theory.

  • One last thing I noticed while skimming through this article is the difference in traditional and discourse analysis interviews. If a researcher chooses to use discourse analysis as a means of data processing, then they must systematically prepare interview questions that align with the consistency of their proposed theory and allows for diversity in responses. This way, the researcher can later conduct an in-depth, meaningful transcription of the phonetic and intonational features behind each verbal response.   

That’s all I got to say for this week folks ~~

Xoxo,

Francesca Di Fabio 🙂

Writing & Video Game Design – Phenomenology

Hey, hey, peoples ~~~

While reading, “A Research-Based Approach to Game Writing Pedagogy” by Seth Andrew Hudson, I instantly thought about how I know very little about game writing, and what kind of sub-features that writing genre entails. I would assume, essentially, that game writing involves writing detailed narration or prose with dialogue as to liven up the setting and the characters within the game. I would also assume that game writing entails a great deal of conflict within the game narrative, in which players level up once they have conquered or solved the assigned challenge (or conflict). My knowledge of the video game culture is solely based off watching my older brother and his friends play video games, each one of them connected to a headset so that I can’t miss my brother’s triumphant screams into his computer screen, which vibrate through the thin walls of our home (lol). From my direct observations, I’ve concluded that whatever kind of video game is being played – singular, multiplayer, or a free-roaming-role-playing game (open world games like GTA), that involves some form of fighting, battling, adventuring on quests, playing sports, or racing – all often call for setting up missions and changing levels.

So, inevitably, the game writer and narration designers are pushed to think outside the lines of the stereotypical plot arc of “good story telling.” The characters are essentially faced with a consistent inability (through failed quests or challenges) to achieve a noteworthy success, multiple times over. And if the players happen to be skilled in mastering challenges, the following levels must be more complex in design, like maybe including multi-step conflict challenges within one level, adding more characters into the video game storyline, or altering or inserting more pathways, rewards, consequences, or obstacles for each video game character, (depending on the player’s already-mastered levels or challenges, of course). I feel like writing a video game would feel similar to writing a ginormous, never-ending, action-packed, book series. I can imagine video game writing being very competitive in nature and extremely anxiety-inducing, as the writer must continuously write new creative plot ideas or paths or levels for characters to choose from, especially when there really are no successful teaching frameworks offered within this genre of writing.

The main problem in question for Hudson’s study seems to be that there are no effective pedagogies or theoretical frameworks to teach effective game design writing in higher education. (Hudson, 92). It also doesn’t help that there is little to no support and guidance in this inquiry-problem question from those in this writing genre community, like successful narrative designers, comic book writers, scene editors, and other game writers alike. Professional game writers within the field offer “limited attempts” on how to plan, establish, and execute a deliberate framework of game writing teaching methods that outline effective course design and instruction, probably because they were never taught themselves (Hudson, 93). I imagine these “professional game writers” used their unique writing talents and combined them with their passion for indulging in video games, and basically just taught themselves how to write effective video game designs through colleague collaboration or trial and error. I assume such because Hudson even explained how “the distance between understandings in these two spheres does not indicate a lack of sophistication on the part of the industry or of game writers. Rather, it is indictive of an opportunity for educator-researchers to engage with the field directly” (94). Therefore, there is a high demand for “research-enhanced pedagogy of game writing,” which is something new to my knowledge within the fields of writing studies and interactive digital media (Hudson, 92).

            Without delay, Hudson admits that “it can be difficult to develop pedagogies in creative fields” (92). Video game writing is a creative field of study or practice that not only embraces traditional writing features like composition and poetry, but also requires knowledge on technological design and computer skills. Therefore, teaching methods within video game writing as a genre must reinforce, discuss, and practice the importance of both of these skills for productive results. After reading through the “Conceptual Framework and Research Design” section, I’ve noticed that effective pedagogy of this writing genre really boils down to encouraging those studying the craft of writing (especially creative writing) and supporting them through analyzing rhetorical situations. Future instructors of this writing genre should also encourage them to think strategically when confronting new contexts, challenges, or situations (Hudson, 95-96).  

There’s much more to say about the ways in which institutions or departments heads can turn the sub-writing features and computer skills of video game design into effective, curriculum instruction manuals for teaching in higher education. With that being said, I think that’s all I’ve got to say for this week’s research reading ~~~

**The link to where I found the above photo is linked to the image**

Xoxo,

Francesca Di Fabio 🙂

Odyssey’s Journey

A Greek Mythology Poem

low-angle photography of the corner of brown concrete pillars.

The Odyssey, attributed to Homer,
one of the most enduring stories.
Odysseus, heroic and flawed,
his journey spans years, a witness
to the indomitable spirit.
From the trials of Polyphemus,
to Circe’s enchantments,
Odysseus navigates danger.
The Odyssey is a story
of perseverance, longing to return
To his beloved land of Ithaca, to reunite

with his wife Penelope and son Telemachus.

Through trials, Odysseus remains

determined to overcome every obstacle.
But the Odyssey delves deeper,

into themes of identity,

loyalty, temptation, and time. But through trials,

Odysseus remains determined to

overcome every obstacle.

A Reflection on Diane Seuss’s “Frank Sonnets”

Your “Frank Sonnets” collection of sonnets is a revelation 

a bold take on poetry’s traditional form as

each sonnet challenges norms with determination, 

breaking free from the constraints it once controlled. 

In this book the sonnets become a vessel

navigating through the emotional terrain and

with each verse, you uncover life’s battles

balancing despair and hope’s delicate refrain.

I’m amazed by the way you confront many themes 

in particular themes likes suicide you approached with grace

infusing wit and wisdom into every line

as you delve into life’s complexities. 

your poems offer readers a profound view 

a true testament to the human journey we all embark upon

Evolution of Love

A Sonnet Crown on Life’s Evolving Story

Married couple sitting on bench.

In the book of life a story weaves,

a love story unfolds with each passing day

in tender moments hearts find their reprieve,

as life’s current carry us on our way. 

On our way, we journey through the years,

through highs and lows, through laughter and tears,

in each chapter, joy and sorrow nears, 

as life’s unfolding tale becomes more clear.

It becomes more clear with every twist and turn,

The plot thickens, the characters evolve, 

in every triumph, in every lesson that was learned, 

we find the essence of the human resolve.

Human resolve to love and to forgive, 

to embrace each moment and to truly live.

Autoethnography: Round 2, Baby ~

Hey, again, guys, ~~

I wasn’t sure if I had to write a blog post for this week considering it was my presentation week; however, there were two readings on Autoethnography. So, here we go ~~

In light of Val’s assigned autoethnography reading, “An Autoethnography on Learning About Autoethnography” by Sarah Walls, I happened to notice a phrase, or specific words in particular, that struck me differently from my first read over. I read this reading again after reading the many insightful, in-depth class blog posts.

Specifically, I’d like to draw attention toward Rachel & Ricki’s blog posts as they did so well explaining, in their own words, the criticism or opposing force against autoethnography as a valid research method of inquiry. So, there I was, reading Wall’s viewpoint again, and found myself, once again nodding in agreement to everything she had said and stopped when I happened to skim over this phrase, in which I cut from its full-length quote, “[. . .] researcher’s rhetoric, prejudice, and experience in interpretation of observations [. . .]” (Wall, 147). I’ve read over those words before regarding autoethnography and was confused to why I had stopped reading further for a moment.

The irony is that this phrase I pulled and cut came from a quote in support of autoethnography as a valid method of research inquiry and academic writing (in which, I do still agree with BTW). However, after reading how Ricki and Rachel felt toward autoethnography, I perceived it differently than before. Or better said, I came to really understand the so-called dangers of just using autoethnography as a research method of inquiry by its lonesome. Ricki said it best – I quote, “I am still not the biggest fan because I just don’t trust other’s judgement,” and he continues by then saying, “[. . .] I cannot imagine an autoethnography being the sole method. It would have to be paired with something else.” I completely understand the mistrust in others and found the mixed-methods type of approach toward autoethnography a brilliant way to liven the data that comes from biographical narratives.

I had first sided only with the rise of postmodernism and the freedom autoethnography brings into the research community, particularly academic writing. We are studying a Humanities discipline, after all (Writing Studies), I thought to myself. I then thought, wouldn’t it be wrong of me to agree with all the insightful criticism of a newly developed research that’s essentially in favor of a more humanistic approach to academic writing?

But the truth is, is that we are all human, and with that comes many flaws and thick layers of deception (Rachel used this word in her blog post, and it struck me). The mind is so complex that we even deceive ourselves – more so than not, until the delusions must be dimmed and managed by medication. In NO WAY or manner am I implying that to be mentally ill equates to unreliability. Everyone has a story, in which some parts can be trusted and some not. If I were claiming so, then everything I say or write could be considered a misguided delusional thought. But I’d be lying if not to admit how jaded memories can really be, and to the very danger in solely believing what it is your mind tells you.

So, my eyes have now been mindfully opened to appreciate each critical remark opposing the validity of autoethnographic research because I see them now as kind warnings, that would speak: Yes, we are indeed products of our uniquely lived experiences that hold concrete value and meaning in this world, some powerful enough to exact change. Although please be aware of the mind and all the deceiving creases it entails.

With all being said, I’m very impressed by this week blog postings. I feel like I needed to rehear (or reread) the opposing remarks from a fellow classmate – rather than a researcher, philosopher, or autoethnographer – to be reminded about the dangers of fully and whole-heartedly trusting the subjectivity of memories.

Thank you, guys !! ❤ lol

Xoxo,

Francesca Di Fabio 

Beloved Sunflower

Sunflower field under blue sky during daytime.

In the fields of gold where summer’s warmth resides 

A sunflower stands proud gazing towards the sun 

Its petals spread wide like golden tides, 

A testament to nature’s art so finely spun.

Oh, sunflower fair in brilliance you gleam, 

A light of joy in the fields of green 

With every gentle sway you dance and dream 

A sight so splendid that you can’t unsee.

Amidst the whispers of the gentle breeze, 

Your beauty flourishes as a sight to admire 

In your radiant presence the soul finds ease 

As you stand tall in nature’s choir.

Oh, how you captivate with every bloom, 

My most favorite flower in sunlight’s room.